Renewable Rice

Renewable Rice

The headlined proxy war in 2018 between two natural gas “machines” is practically stuff of legend. A year before, Pa.-based EQT acquired Rice Energy for $8.2 billion, creating the nation’s largest natural gas producer. But there was a caveat to the deal; namely, a pledge by EQT that the combined company would operate more efficiently, spend less, and make more. But in short order, the merger fell into failure. EQT’s stock price plunged 42% to the tune of $4 billion. So, the Rice Brothers came calling along with shareholder insistence to boot bosses, displace board members, and elect Toby Rice as EQT’s new CEO. Suffice it to say, the Rices know how to produce conventional gas profitably. Now, they plan to take renewable gas to the stratosphere. REC today is following the latest from Rice Acquisition Corp., which has purchased Aria Energy and Archaea Energy for $1.27 billion. Combined, the two will be sworn in as the nation’s largest producer of RNG captured from landfills, with a dozen projects in place, 20 more in the works, and plans to triple output in three years.

 

EQT Corporation

EQT Corporation is a leading independent natural gas producer with an evolutionary focus on our future. EQT has operations in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio and is dedicated to responsibly developing our world-class asset base in the core of the Appalachian Basin. EQT is making strides toward becoming the best producer by creating long-term value for all stakeholders, including employees, landowners, communities, industry partners and investors.

www.eqt.com

What do you think? Learn more about REC and our natural gas marketing services at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

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KM Launches New Clean Venture

KM Launches New Clean Venture

Not quite nine months ago only a handful of midstream operators dipped their collective toe in the renewables waters by adding solar and wind to power operations. A low-carbon future and its writing on the wall already had spurred actions and investments by Big Oil and a few larger independents to include renewable strategies and carbon capture in their infrastructure. Some pipeline operators also responded by implementing (operative word here) renewables where they made sense in sunny or windy locales. Pipeline giant Kinder Morgan, however, has a bigger plan for its adaption to the energy transition. Reese Energy Consulting today is following the latest news from Houston-based KM that not only looks to implement a full array of clean-fuel options into its midstream operations but commercialize them. The company’s newly formed Energy Transitions Ventures group will pursue and develop a combo platter of alt-energies and new tech to include carbon capture and sequestration, hydrogen, renewable natural gas, renewable power generation, renewable diesel production, and electric transmission.

 

Kinder Morgan

Kinder Morgan, Inc. is one of the largest energy infrastructure companies in North America. The company specializes in owning and controlling oil and gas pipelines and terminals. Kinder Morgan owns an interest in or operates approximately 85,000 miles of pipelines and 152 terminals.

www.kindermorgan.com

What do you think? Learn more about REC and our energy services at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

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A Look in the Rear View, Part II

A Look in the Rear View, Part II

The oil and gas industry’s adaption of renewable energies quickened its pace in 2020 as producers, midstream operators, and refiners rolled out new initiatives and investments to power their operations and reduce emissions. Here’s a look at just a few. Houston-based Occidental, a longtime developer and investor of low-carbon technologies and fuels, announced this month it will design and build the world’s largest carbon capture facility in N.D. The company last Fall completed a 174-panel, 120-acre solar farm in the Permian, which now replaces all grid power and supplies all energy for Oxy’s Goldsmith oilfield operations. Tulsa-based midstream giant Williams in May announced it, too, would add solar to its natural gas transmission and processing operations in nine states. But oil refiners, in particular, have been left with little choice to accelerate their shift from fossil fuels to renewable sources. The fallout from COVID and ever-stringent emissions regulations have prompted the largest to the smallest refineries to convert feedstocks to biofuels, such as soybean oil, fats, and kitchen grease. Time to: adapt, re-think, survive.

What do you think? Learn more about our upstream, midstream, and downstream expertise at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

 

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