A Power Dilemma for California

A Power Dilemma for California

The Golden State is in full-blown crisis mode to prevent the collapse of its electrical grid. No, this isn’t the usual disaster flick starring The Rock, although the situation at hand might qualify as a race against time to keep the lights on. Reese Energy Consulting today is following the latest news from Calif., now in a state of emergency, which will add natural gas-fueled generators at five power plants across the state to thwart an outage catastrophe. The nation’s largest importer of electricity at 28%, including supplies from Mexico, already this year has issued six “flex alerts” to avoid the rolling blackouts of 2019 and 2020–and now finds itself in a deep-fried pickle to provide reliable power to more than 39+ million residents. Between this Summer’s devastating wildfires, a protracted heat storm, the use of its grid by other states grappling with their own demand struggles, and the strictest environmental policies in the U.S., Calif., will have to rely on more natural gas. Meanwhile, the hunt also is on for those gas supplies as the state, reluctantly, is forced to lean heavier on fossil fuels and less on intermittent energy sources like solar and wind.

What do you think?  Learn more about REC and our natural gas services and expertise at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

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About That Whole Gas Thang

About That Whole Gas Thang

​With all the talk about renewables—and we cover them a lot—natural gas is still the most reliable, plentiful, affordable fuel to achieve a low-carbon future. You need a bridge to get from here to there, and that’s where gas plays its part. Despite its detractors, natural gas will continue playing a global role to heat, cool, cook, and power for the next 3-4 decades. Gas production so far this year has outpaced crude oil post-pandemic and is expected to hit a record 93.3 BCFD by 2022. We produce more of the stuff than any country on earth. We now are set to displace Qatar years earlier than predicted as the world’s largest producer and exporter of LNG, with more than half of 10.5 BCFD of March supplies shipped to Asia—which remains on a slower path to sunset coal as a primary heat and power source. As an aside, the U.S. has transitioned 100+ power plants from coal to natural gas in just the last 10 years; we now have 1,800+. Energy giant bp now has announced a $1.3 billion infrastructure project to capture and collect natural gas to eliminate its Permian flaring by 2025, and no doubt sell those hydrocarbons as the energy source they are.

What do you think? Visit ReeseEnergyConsulting.com to learn more about us at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

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Don’t Know What You’ve Got ‘Til It’s Gone

Don’t Know What You’ve Got ‘Til It’s Gone

Combine historic cold temps with heavy blankets of ice, sleet, and snow. Then ask a midstream operator in Okla., or Texas if they’re busy these days. Reese Energy Consulting is following the latest news as we can keep up with on the winter apocalypse that’s hanging on like an in-law who doesn’t know it’s time to go home. By now you’ve either heard, or experienced firsthand, the havoc an unprecedented Arctic storm can wreak on critical energy infrastructure. REC clients report shutting wells, freezing or frozen pipelines. and paralyzed processing plants while trying to dispatch every available natural gas molecule from storage facilities to overworked utilities. A 40+% reliance on renewable energy at power plants couldn’t pass the smell test as wind turbines froze in Texas and Okla. More than 4.2 million outages were reported across Texas this morning all the way south to Galveston coupled with rolling blackouts in both states. As a result of all this meteorological madness, Monday’s spot price of electricity in Texas shot up 10,000% from $50 to $9,000 per megawatt and natural gas prices are singing opera.

What do you think? Learn more about REC at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.​