An All-Around EPIC Win

An All-Around EPIC Win

EPIC Midstream’s vision to create a NGLs “super system” has officially been realized after only four years. Reese Energy Consulting today is following the latest news from Houston-based EPIC, which in 2017 set off to build an integrated pipeline and fractionation network that would offer a smaller but best-in-class alternative to a crowded Mt. Belvieu. The company kick-started its ambitious plans with construction of the 700-mile Y-Grade Pipeline to flow Permian and Eagle Ford NGLs to Gulf Coast refiners, petrochem companies, and export markets. But more work lay ahead. EPIC last year completed its first greenfield fractionator at its Corpus Christi site that connected the Y-Grade Pipeline with an initial 110 MBbls of fractionation capacity. Now, the final legs of this super system are done and open for business. EPIC has announced completion of a 165-mile NGLs pipeline that extends from the company’s Corpus Christi facility to the Sweeny, Texas, fractionation and storage complex, adding another 130 MBbls of owned capacity. EPIC also has put into service a 175-mile propane pipeline for deliveries to Sweeny. Congratulations to all on the latest EPIC achievement.

What do you think? Learn more about REC and our natural gas and NGLs expertise at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

EPIC Midstream

EPIC was formed in 2017 to build, own and operate midstream infrastructure in both the Permian and Eagle Basins. EPIC operates the EPIC Crude Oil Pipeline and the EPIC NGL Pipeline that span approximately 700-miles servicing the Delaware, Midland Basins and Eagle Ford Shale.

epicmid.com

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Baby, You Can Drive My Car. You Just Can’t Sit in It.

Baby, You Can Drive My Car. You Just Can’t Sit in It.

We don’t typically sit around discussing the state of the automobile industry, but this latest news has earned our attention. With the shutdown last month of Gulf Coast petrochem plants, car makers face a new headache that threatens to slow or even halt production starting as early as next week. REC today is following Automotive News, which reports vehicle plants now are dealing with a critical shortage of refined products used to make plastics, rubber, and special fibers. Of particular concern is propylene oxide—the raw material in polyurethane foam used to make vehicle seats. Last year’s cuts in automobile production meant less demand for propylene oxide, which then meant Texas plants stopped producing it for a stretch. Factor in a quicker-than-expected demand recovery topped with an unprecedented winter storm, and you have all the ingredients for no ingredients available. The looming scarcity has at least one auto exec predicting the problem will be larger than the shortage of microchips.

What do you think? Learn more about REC at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

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