A New Carbon Connection

A New Carbon Connection

In late 2016, Texas became home to the nation’s only—and world’s largest—carbon capture project at a coal-fired power plant that emitted more CO2 than any other in the nation. This was The Big Test and hopes played high. Almost as high as the $1 billion price tag that limited retrofits to only one of four coal-fueled units. Texas-based NRG Energy tapped Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries for its promising KM CDR Process™ to be applied at a commercial scale at the company’s WA Parish power plant, later renamed Petra Nova. Long story short, while the technology performed to expectations, NRG last year was forced to mothball the facility citing low oil prices that made captured carbon for use in enhanced oil recovery operations uneconomical. Back to square one for Mitsubishi. But this time with gas. Reese Energy Consulting today is following the latest news from NextDecade and Occidental, which have inked an agreement with Mitsubishi for the design, license, and performance guarantee of its KM CDR tech at NextDecade’s planned Rio Grande LNG facility.

 

NRG Energy

NRG Energy, Inc. is a large American energy company, dual-headquartered in Princeton, New Jersey and Houston, Texas. It was formerly the wholesale arm of Northern States Power Company, which became Xcel Energy, but became independent in 2000. NRG Energy is involved in energy generation and retail electricity.

www.nrg.com

What do you think? Learn more about REC and our natural gas and LNG services at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

You Might Also Like…

Stuck in the Middle with ‘Sue’

Stuck in the Middle with ‘Sue’

It’s been a rough couple of days for cargo tanker pilots carrying crude oil and commercial goods trying to transit the Suez Canal. This, after all bi-directional traffic looking to pass through one of the world’s largest, busiest waterways grinded to a sudden halt Tuesday. Surrounded north and south by a flotilla of 100+ of some of the largest container ships on Earth, the 1,312’ Ever Given was en route from China to the Netherlands via the Suez Canal when a strong bluster of wind blew her off course, running the vessel aground and turning it sideways where the tanker became precariously stuck. With the ship’s bow touching the eastern canal wall and the stern wedged against the western, Egyptian tugboats now are scrambling to dislodge the ship, although other tankers unable to turn around will remain idle for days in a traffic jam unlike any other in the canal’s 150-year history. As a point of reference, if stood upright, the Ever Given is as tall as the Empire State Building.

What do you think? Learn more about Reese Energy Consulting and our range of oil and gas services and expertise at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

​​

You Might Also Like…

The Big Fill Up

The Big Fill Up

Mere days ago, a Shell-chartered Russian crude oil tanker set sail from Corpus Christi, Texas, marking the first ever ship-to-ship LNG fueling of a large-capacity Aframax in the U.S. The 11-hour bunkering process took place at Port Canaveral, Fla.., via a second chartered Shell vessel. Now, 750,000 Bbls of WTI crude are bound for Europe. Reese Energy Consulting today is following the latest news from Shell, whose fill up of an Aframax in the Gulf Coast demonstrates LNG can now be supplied ship-to-ship in the U.S., along transatlantic trade routes between Europe and the Gulf, and the Gulf and Canada. Until now, LNG fueling infrastructure of large capacity ships was limited to Northern Europe and Singapore. As REC has earlier reported, marine operators are in hyper-mode to convert fleets to LNG to comply with last year’s IMO 2020, which mandates an aggressive reduction of sulphur oxide emissions generated by heavy fuel oil. This includes everything from commercial ships, tugs, and ferries to government marine vessels.

What do you think? Learn more about REC and our natural gas and LNG services at www.ReeseEnergyConsulting.com.

 

You Might Also Like…