The Suppliers, Part I:  A Merger of Equals

The Suppliers, Part I: A Merger of Equals

Following the massive losses recently announced by the world’s three largest oilfield suppliers—Schlumberger, Halliburton, and Baker Hughes—this year’s crushing events are just the latest blow to service providers both large and small facing challenges that originally began in 2014. For those now treading water in this no-mercy environment, few if any are hopeful for a lifeline in the form of another shale boom. Instead, these hired hands of the industry are consolidating, embracing new technologies, creating their own opportunities, and even pivoting their oil patch skills to areas they view more promising for the long term.

In Part I of our new series The Suppliers, RMR looks at consolidation within a subsect of the nation’s oil and gas industry that remains vital to upstream, midstream, and downstream operations. We’ll start with upstream because that’s where it all begins.

NexTier Oilfield Solutions

NexTier is a leading provider of integrated completions focused on US land. We deliver safe, efficient and innovative services that enable our customers to win by accelerating production while generating leading returns.

nextierofs.com

 C&J Energy Services and Keane Group  

To look forward, you have to first look back.

According to financial pundits, the combination of C&J and Keane last year marked the true genesis of consolidation in the onshore oil and gas services market, particularly among publicly traded companies. In a merger of equals, C&J and Keane—both pressure pumping big dogs—merged in a $1.8 billion, all-stock deal that saw a name change (Houston-based NextTier Oilfield Solutions), a combined well completion and production services company with 2.3 million hydraulic fracturing horsepower, and a more competitive landscape in terms of price and service offerings vs larger service players.

Since the merger, NextTier this year has made difficult but promising financial decisions to stay the course that include divesting its well support services business in March; leveraging the latest surface, subsurface and fluid system technologies, and making the ubiquitous cost, staff, and budget cuts rife among others in its league. The company will announce 2Q earnings next week.

KLX Energy

KLX Energy Services is the oilfield’s most prepared service provider: always ready to help operators get ahead no matter what the challenge. With proprietary technology, proven experts and strategic locations near you—nobody else brings you true Next Level Readiness.

www.klxenergy.com

KLX Energy Services and Quintana Join Forces

On a smaller scale, KLX and Quintana—two forces heralding asset-light oilfield solutions that include drilling, completion, and two of the largest fleets of coiled tubing and wireline assets—have now decided to exchange nuptials. The all-stock marriage will assume the KLX name and move headquarters to Houston. Upon completion of the merger, the company expects to see cost synergies in excess of $40 million within a year and will continue eyeballing other consolidation opportunities within the oilfield service industry.

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The New Pipeline Landscape vs the Law of Diminishing Returns

The New Pipeline Landscape vs the Law of Diminishing Returns

The nation’s pipeline projects this year have met with volcanic reactions that canceled three majors in the Eastern Atlantic, stalled several others, and turned upside down at least three already in service. These are the facts at hand, which now bring even greater challenges to natural gas and power utilities in need of more fuel to meet consumer demand; refineries that require feedstock; petrochemical facilities that depend on supplies to produce raw materials used globally; and U.S. producers who transport oil and gas to end markets. If the current pipeline landscape subsists, the aftereffects are predicted to bring seriously diminishing returns in an era of carbon-neutral goals.

Rystad Energy

Rystad Energy is an independent energy research and business intelligence company providing data, tools, analytics and consultancy services to the global energy industry. Their products and services cover energy fundamentals and the global and regional upstream, oilfield services and renewable energy industries, tailored to analysts, managers and executives alike. 

www.rystadenergy.com

The nation’s pipeline projects this year have met with volcanic reactions that canceled three majors in the Eastern Atlantic, stalled several others, and turned upside down at least three already in service. These are the facts at hand, which now bring even greater challenges to natural gas and power utilities in need of more fuel to meet consumer demand; refineries that require feedstock; petrochemical facilities that depend on supplies to produce raw materials used globally; and U.S. producers who transport oil and gas to end markets. If the current pipeline landscape subsists, the aftereffects are predicted to bring seriously diminishing returns in an era of carbon-neutral goals.

According to Rystad Energy, if the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) is shut down in August following a July court mandate to halt operations and empty its line of Bakken crude oil, an initial 300,000 BPD will have to be transported by rail. The DAPL is the largest outbound Bakken pipeline, which means other pipelines and refineries will need to absorb at least 900,000 BPD. And as far as those “other” pipelines, the DAPL ruling came on the heels of a court-ordered closure earlier in July of the Bakken’s Tesoro High Plains Pipeline that’s been in operation for 67 years. As curtailed volumes in the Bakken are expected to come back online later this year, Rystad foresees significant bottlenecks ahead with the lack of primary exit routes. This suggests more rail, more trucks, more flaring, and more emissions. Again, diminishing returns.

Rystad also predicts gas output from the Permian will rebound during the second half of this year and is expected to return to record levels by late 2021. That’s the good news. The bad news is that regulatory obstacles and belt-tightening have delayed or put on hold several pipelines to feed supplies to the East Coast, Gulf Coast LNG facilities, and Mexico. With the need for new gas takeaway projects from the Permian beginning in 2023, Rystad estimates another period of increased gas flaring citing it’s highly possible that any new pipelines will be approved too late, resulting again in a situation with insufficient infrastructure.

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